The Australian expats who have moved back to escape from Covid

High-flying Australian expats are clamouring to return home as the Covid pandemic remains a danger in much of the world.

Before struck, white-collar professionals worked aboard in places including , New York and , where income tax rates are half that of Australia.

Now many of them are struggling to get back to the relative safety of Australia, with high-achieving expats fiercely competing for the local jobs they used to do overseas.

Investment banker Catherine McCormack has swapped a high-flying career in New York to be a corporate boss in Australia, while cryptocurrency trading CEO Caroline Bowler has swapped Singapore for .

Ben Robertson, an Adelaide-raised legal team leader based in Singapore, said Australian expat lawyers were searching for work as finance compliance lawyers, with some finding success.

Australian expats are clamouring to move back home as Covid remains a danger in much of the world. Jarden Securities managing director Catherine McCormack, 39, last year moved back to Australia from New York where she was a managing director with investment bank Goldman Sachs

Australian expats are clamouring to move back home as Covid remains a danger in much of the world. Jarden Securities managing director Catherine McCormack, 39, last year moved back to Australia from New York where she was a managing director 비트겟 킹스컵 with investment bank Goldman Sachs

‘Some friends got jobs surprisingly easy,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

‘It seemed pretty easy to find something with all the banking royal commission stuff happening.’

The banks are also paying top dollar for legal expertise after Westpac last year agreed to pay a $1.3billion fine for breaching money-laundering laws 23 times.

Compliance managers can command salaries of up to $350,000, data from recruitment firm Robert Half shows.

Nonetheless, competition to get a highly-paid corporate job in Australia is fierce, and some former expat lawyers are struggling.

‘It’s tough for expats coming home.The work they’ve done overseas isn’t really considered valuable,’ Mr Robertson said.

Ben Robertson, an Adelaide-raised legal team leader based in Singapore, said Australian expat lawyers were searching for work as finance compliance lawyers, with some finding success

Ben Robertson, an Adelaide-raised legal team leader based in Singapore, said Australian expat lawyers were searching for work as finance compliance lawyers, with some finding success

Nick Deligiannis, the managing director of recruitment company Hays in Australia and New Zealand, said the Covid pandemic had encouraged high-income professionals to return home.

BTC Markets chief executive Caroline Bowler moved to Melbourne from Singapore in 2018 to run a cryptocurrency exchange platform and has fallen in love with the coffee

BTC Markets chief executive Caroline Bowler moved to Melbourne from Singapore in 2018 to run a cryptocurrency exchange platform and has fallen in love with the coffee

‘Given the pandemic and 비트겟 킹스컵 the safety issues, and the health issues, there are many Australians, professionals overseas, that want to get back,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

‘Getting back is obviously a lot more difficult and that’s part of the skills shortage issue.’

Mr Robertson, who is vaccinated against Covid, said his home city of Adelaide didn’t offer the same kind of high salaries so for now, he is working out of New York and answering to his managers in Singapore at odd hours.

‘Time zone’s a challenge.Sometimes things need to happen in real time which means midnight calls or even later,’ he said. 

Singapore also has a top income tax rate of 22 per cent, compared with Australia’s 45 per cent.

BTC Markets chief executive Caroline Bowler moved to Melbourne from Singapore in 2018 to run a cryptocurrency exchange platform.

‘This sounds a bit cliched but I really like the coffee,’ she told Daily Mail Australia.

Nick Deligiannis, the managing director of recruitment company Hays in Australia and New Zealand, said the Covid pandemic had encouraged high-income professionals to return home

Nick Deligiannis, the managing director of recruitment company Hays in Australia and New Zealand, said the Covid pandemic had encouraged high-income professionals to return home

The 42-year-old Irish citizen moved to Australia for love, adopting Collingwood as her home team and playing women’s AFL.

But with Australians banned from travelling overseas for a holiday, it has been ‘at least two years’ since she has seen her parents who live at Longford, north-west of Dublin.

‘It’s very difficult. I’m one of those people who are looking to get back to see my parents,’ she said.

‘I’ve got siblings around the world and none of us all live in the same country so for us, it’s about that homing pigeon response to get back to Ireland to see our family and be together.’

Jarden Securities managing director Catherine McCormack, 39, last year moved back to Australia from New York where she was a managing director with investment bank Goldman Sachs.

She doesn’t regret leaving the Big Apple as the city battles gun crime problems.

‘The FOMO isn’t as bad as knowing that New York now isn’t the New York I moved to or enjoyed for 10 years,’ she told Bloomberg.